Presentation: grow your business with a coaching group

Please join us for this presentation at David Lloyds on Friday 23 April at 10am (more info when you enter the booking form): it may change the way you work.  Running your own business, being your own boss, has great advantages: freedom, independence, autonomy and financial rewards.

At the same time it is easy to get caught into a spiral of activities that are wasting your precious time, procrastination, lack of focus, motivation or inspiration; so if you are:

  • a business owner/partner in a small business, perhaps trading for a few months;
  • contractor or freelance in the marketing/creative industry;
  • thinking of starting a new business in the marketing/creative industry;

You will find very interesting the possibilities that a highly focussed coaching group can offer to you and your business.  Please have a look at the following questions:

  • are you working hard and making less money than you deserve?
  • have you ever asked yourself why some people work hard and barely survive while others seem to be thriving while working a just few hours per day?
  • do you think there is space for improvement in your efficiency and effectiveness?
  • would you like to work more on your business rather than in your business?

If you answered yes to two or more of the above you should come along.

This one hour presentation will be run by Massimo Gaetani, business and executive coach, founder of MaGa Coaching.  The presentation will show you the tangible benefits of how working within a coaching group, facilitated by a professional business coach, can help growing your business, focussing on essential profitable activities and being accountable toward yourself in achieving important milestones.

Events

Posted under Announcements, Events

This post was written by MaGa Coaching on 18 March 2010

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Presentation: peer group for business growth

Please join us at Begin Space (details in the booking form below) for this presentation.  Running your own business, being your own boss, offers great advantages: freedom, independence, autonomy and financial rewards.  At the same time it is easy to get caught into a spiral of time wasting activities, procrastination, lack of focus or inspiration; so if you are:

  • a business owner/partner in a high tech small business, perhaps a start-up
  • a software development contractor or freelance
  • thinking of starting a new business in high tech

you will find very interesting the possibilities that a highly focussed peer group can offer to you and your business.  Please have a look at the following questions:

  • Are you working hard and making less money than you deserve?
  • Have you ever asked yourself why some people work hard and barely survive while others seem to be thriving while working a few hours per day?
  • Do you think there is space for improvement in your efficiency and effectiveness?
  • Would you like to work more on your business rather than in your business?

If you answered yes to two or more of the above you should come along.

This one hour presentation will be run by Massimo Gaetani, business and executive coach, founder of MaGa Coaching.  The presentation will show you the tangible benefits of how working within a peer group, facilitated by a professional business coach, can help growing your business, focussing on essential profitable activities and being accountable toward yourself in achieving important milestones.

This is a free event: coffee and cakes will be available to participants.  Please book your place using the form below:

Events

Posted under Announcements, Events

This post was written by MaGa Coaching on 9 February 2010

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Procrastination: a few coaching questions to help you moving on

Procrastination is a common issue that I encounter when working with solopreneurs and people running small businesses.  Procrastination can be defined as “putting off a pending task because of laziness, lack of interest” or different prioritization about what should be done.  Without a precise and well defined mechanism of accountability we choose tasks we like and keep delaying the ones we like less, and this can become a dangerous habit.  The effects of procrastination on many of my clients to date was initially to affect their performance at work then, increasingly, it was producing stress and other related diseases that eventually affected the physical health of some of them.

When clients are complaining to me about how procrastination is affecting their performance and ultimately their well being I am some times attempted to tell them to just get on with the pending tasks they are procrastinating.  That would be logical and easy but then, as a coach, I must (and I do) use a questioning methodology that is helping the clients’ thinking process and it helps them to see a way forward and commit toward the necessary actions.

Here are some of the questions that I use in these situations:

  • Is the completion of this pending task affecting other activities?
  • How often do you think about this pending task?
  • Is the completion of this pending task affecting other people?
  • How would you feel if you could tick this pending task off your list?
  • Do you feel guilty when you think about this pending task?
  • Is something stopping you from completing this pending task?
  • How much time per day/week do you spend thinking about this pending task?
  • Would you behave differently if you promised to complete this pending task to a colleague, client or supplier?
  • How can I help your thinking toward the best outcome for you?

The questions above are not in random order: there is no logical priority in using one before the other and I never needed to use more than 2 or 3 of them to move the client toward a commitment of completion by the following session.  I would usually choose the questions following the content of the conversation that led to the procrastination topic.

Next time you are procrastinating try reading the above questions and see whether they can help you complete your pending task(s) by tackling procrastination head on.

Posted under Articles

This post was written by massimo on 8 January 2010

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What is the real cause behind that delayed task?

While working with a client this week I helped her to identify the real reason for her to delay a very important action and putting it off for more than a month.

Two sessions before the client, that I will call AB to protect her privacy, decided that it was pivotal for her business to hire a VA (virtual assistant) to help her concentrating on her main job and becoming more effective.  Having a list of three well known VA in the area she committed to ring all of them and evaluate which one would best suit her needs.  AB stated that the whole operation would have taken about one hour that it would have been completed by the next session.

Two session and a month later the action was still pending so I decided to be investigate a little the thinking process about an action that:

  1. it a was a necessary step toward the achievement of the goal we are working on
  2. it required short time to be completed

I therefore tackled the conversation as follows:

Massimo: I see this action is still incomplete: can I ask you what is getting in the way?

AB (a bit embarrassed): oh, well other things got in the way.

Massimo: if I may, I would say you are somehow avoiding this action.  Do you think it is still important for the achievement of your goal?

AB (trying to hide her deeper emotions): yes of course but…

Massimo: I have a feeling that you have a deeper reason for avoiding this action.  Is it something you could share with me?

AB (looking more relieved): you know… I have been thinking for a long time about these three VA and I don’t like any of them so I don’t thing I would like to work with any of them.

Massimo: that’s interesting and what could you do about this?

AB (more relieved): I guess I could look for others available in the area.

Massimo: do you think you could do this over the next two weeks?

AB (smiling and full of motivation): yes absolutely.

Massimo: great! I’ll add it an action and we’ll discuss it during the next session if that’s ok.

Five days later AB sent me an Email stating that this action was complete: she found the right VA, she hired her and in 2 days her work was already showing great progress for AB’s business.  What I did in this case was checking the emotions around her decision process: procrastination in this case was caused by her not liking the people she was supposed to ring and an entire month went by before we managed to acknowledge these emotions and help AB to move forward.

Next time you are procrastinating on a particular action try having a good look around what emotions are linked to it:  you may find yourself thinking quite intensely about something completely different from what you are supposed to be doing.

Posted under Coaching in Action

This post was written by massimo on 11 December 2009

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